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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire rememberthefallen.co.uk's event. ... See MoreSee Less

Passchendaele Remembered

November 4, 2017, 10:00am - November 4, 2017, 3:30pm

Details of our event on 4th November 2017 - Passchendaele Remembered

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Malvern Family History Society shared Explore The Past's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Are you off to Worcester Beer Festival this weekend? Did you know Worcester used to have an official ale taster? They would need to check on the quality of the beer, which was usually brewed on site, and if anyone was found selling bad ale they would be reported to the courts. So the job may not have been as popular as it might seem! The Ale Taster had to swear an oath, like many other office holder, and this is contained in an oath book in the Worcester City Archives. Read more about it on our blog www.explorethepast.co.uk/2013/12/treasures-from-worcestershires-past-2-the-ale-tasters-oath/

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Malvern Family History Society shared Jimmy Cooke's post. ... See MoreSee Less

1960 must have been a wonderful place to live

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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcester's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Date for your diaries! Come along and see many more of the fascinating historic photos we've been posting on this page, share your memories and hear more about a project to make the collection available online.

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

GEORGE DANDY was a coal merchant at “ASTWOOD”, Barnards Green from about 1910 until his death in 1941. His wife Ada Mary (nee Blencowe) continued the business for a short period after this date. The house was so-named because George was born at Astwood Bank, Alcester to John (a farm labourer) and Emma Jane (charwoman). In fact, as they lived next door to “Astwood Court”, it seems probable that he worked at “Astwood Court Farm”. George had two sisters (Emma Elizabeth & Ellen Sophia) and four brothers (William, Albert, Ernest & Frederick). Whereas his sisters seem to have stayed close to the family home, all of the brothers moved to Malvern to be employed in jobs linked to coal and the railway. In 1901 William (b 1865) was a ‘porter on railway’ living at Green Hill Cottage, Malvern Common: George (b 4th May 1872) also lived at Green Hill Cottage but working as a ‘coal yardsman’: Albert (b 1869), Ernest (b 1877) and Frederick (b 1882) were ‘coal carters’; living in cottages in Poolbrook. Fred later moved to Shardlow, Derbyshire where by 1939 he had become an “engine driver at the iron works”. Littlebury’s Directory for 1908 lists George Dandy as a “salesman” working for J & N Nadin & Co. and Edward Dandy (could this actually be Ernest?) as salesman for South Wales & Cannock Chase Coal Co at Midland siding, ST.Andrew's Road. By 1911 George and Ada - with five year old William George, ten year old Dorris May and four year old Gladys May Naylor who was adopted - had moved in to “ASTWOOD” with the back yard (pictured) opening onto Upper Chase Road (Number 17 shown) being used for the coal business. George’s mother died in Malvern in 1916 as did his father in 1927. He continued working until his death in 1941, the same year that his son William John, who was in the Royal Army Medical Corps, died. Ada appears to have moved out of “Astwood” soon after and died in Evesham in 1955. Further points: Has anyone evidence that George and Ada had links with the Salvation Army (two salvationists stayed with them as visitors in 1911)? Did the yard on to Upper Chase Road continue to be used as a coal merchants after WW2? I have more information about Albert, Ernest & Frederick. Also, I have some deductions about Gladys May Naylor if anyone has a specific interest. PHOTO IS COPYRIGHT AS I PAID A LOT OF MONEY FOR IT LAST WEEK! May be of interest Geoff Lewis .

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The Society's July meeting.

5th July 2017 at 7pm
At Dyson Perrins Academy, Yates Hay Road, Malvern. WR14 1WD

Our Annual General Meeting takes place this month and we try to follow this with a topical subject of interest to our members. We are pleased to announce that we will have a short talk from Frank Townsend on the General Registry Office and the changes that have taken place in recent months along with the plans that are being proposed for the future. These have a significant effect and hoped for benefits for us family historians.
Please join us for our annual review and to hear this latest news on the GRO before our summer break in August.
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Malvern Family History Society shared WLHF - Worcestershire Local History Forum's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Historic Gloucester: Revolution & Innovation Gloucester History Festival 2016 was a huge success, the next festival will be 2-17 September 2017 and the theme for this year is ‘Revolution & Innovation’. Make a note in your diary to keep these dates free and see gloucesterhistoryfestival.co.uk/ for more details

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Malvern Family History Society shared Archaeology Magazine's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Gaps in the incisors of a number of individuals excavated in Durham, England, caused by smoking clay pipes, helped identify them as 17th-century Scottish captives. archaeology.org/issues/255-1705/features/5465-scotland-dunbar-battle (Courtesy Durham University, North News and Pictures)

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Malvern Family History Society shared Brian Iles's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Here's one for Paul.

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

Many thanks to Bill Burton for communicating it to me.

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Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

25/5/1917 2/8th Worcestershire Regiment follow in 4th Worcestershire's footsteps; the story of a Malvern schoolmaster A century ago today as the men of the 4th Worcestershire Regiment (29th Division) finally moved back after being heavily engaged at the Battle of Arras, the 61st Division moved up the line, and the 2/7th and 2/8th Worcestershire came into the Arras battle-area. In the middle of May, the South Midland Territorials had been relieved by French troops in the line before St Quentin, and had been drawn back into reserve near Amiens. After a few days in that area the Division moved north. Both Worcestershire battalions marched on may 21st to Beauval and thence on May 23rd to Sus-St-Leger. Next day the two Battalions moved forward by ‘bus to billets in Arras. The stay of the 61st Division in the Arras area was, however, of but short duration. The main strength of the British Army was being shifted further north, and on June 6th it became known that the 61st Division would be transferred to Flanders. One man of the 4th Worcestershire Regiment was Malvernite, Samuel Bannister. He had Territorial connections having enlisted with his brother into the Worcestershire Yeomanry and serving in Gallipoli and Egypt before being commissioned into the Worcestershire Regiment. He was posted to the 4th Battalion, then part of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and was one of the last men to leave the Gallipoli Peninsula when Anglo-French Forces withdrew in early 1916. Samuel Bannister the second son of Samuel and Margaret Bannister of Victoria House, Cowleigh Road was born on August 19th 1892. He was educated at North Malvern Boys School, and won a scholarship to Worcester Royal Grammar School where he studied from 1905 to 1911. Not tired of education, Samuel Bannister followed his brother Joseph and sister Alice into teaching . It was later written that as a schoolboy Captain Bannister showed himself “the soul of honour and chivalry, and won not only popularity for his fine record as a student and sportsman but sincere respect from masters and boys alike for the steady loyalty with which he upheld the highest ideals and the honour of the [North Malvern] School, where his memory will ever be cherished with loving pride.” Sam Bannister was a very keen sportsman, playing both cricket and football, holding a silver cup for heavy-weight boxing and being also an accomplished rifleman. Samuel and Joseph were given leave to join the Worcestershire Yeomanry on the 2nd September 1914 and five days later left the boys at North Malvern to join the first line unit at Newbury in Nottinghamshire. In April 1915 the Yeomanry were sent to Egypt. Samuel stayed on (possibly with the regimental transport) while his brother proceeded with the rest of the unit to land at Suvla Bay on the Gallipoli Peninsula on August 8th. On the 21st August the yeoman mounted an attack on Scimitar Hill and Joseph was slightly wounded. In the meantime, Samuel had moved to Cairo and trained for a commission. He became an officer in October 1915 and was posted as a replacement to the 4th Worcestershire Regiment, which had suffered such high casualties at the Dardanelles. He landed on the Peninsula shortly after and became Bombing Officer and played an important role in the skilful evacuation of Suvla and Cape Helles on the night of the 8th/9th January 1916, being one of the last four officers to leave. The 4th Worcesters went first to Egypt, but were soon in France – disembarking on the 15th March 1916. Samuel Bannister served throughout the whole of that year, taking part in the Battle of the Somme in July and through exceptionally good work, gained the “warm approval of his superior officers and the entire trust and goodwill of his men.” He was home on leave for Christmas 1916. On his return to France he took over the duties of the Battalion Transport Officer (putting his considerable knowledge of horsemanship into good use no doubt). Not long before the opening of the Battle of Arras in April 1917, Sam Bannister was promoted to Acting Captain and given command of ‘Y’ Company. On the 12th April 1917 Bannister’s Company took over a support trench (which had been recently captured by the 12th Division) near the village of Monchy-le-Preux from the Middlesex Regiment. The 29th Division, to which Bannister’s Battalion belonged, was to carry on the attack on the 13th, but these plans were postponed. On the 14th two battalions of the Brigade attacked, but were met by a powerful counter action, and the Worcesters, who were holding the line, had to repel the advancing Germans. A soldier of ‘Y’ Company testified that Captain Bannister was “one to whom fear was unknown, and he infused his own daring spirit into his Company, which lost in him one of its best and most valued officers.” He was hit by a shell splinter which blew his left arm completely off, and he also received a terrible wound to the knee. However in spite of these injuries he refused to be carried away until a fellow officer, who he deemed to be in an even worse condition, had been evacuated. The stretcher-bearers returned to find Captain Bannister walking slowly to the first aid post. He was taken to hospital, and despite the best efforts of the medical staff, died the following day. On hearing of his death, the officer commanding the 4th Worcesters wrote to Captain Bannister’s father: “As Officer Comdg 4th Worc Regt I write to convey our sympathy with you at the great loss which has come to you in the death of your son. He had his left arm blown off on the morning of the 14th and at the same time another Officer was hit, he absolutely refused to be taken away till the other officer was cleared and expressed a wish to remain with his Coy. His courage and bravery was a fine example to those around him and when he was taken away the whole of his Coy cheered him as he left. "He was a personal friend of mine and was with me since the Dardanelles days. I put him in charge of the last party to leave Helles and Suvla on both occasions knowing I could depend on him. "I promoted him a Temporary Captain only about 10 days ago and I consider I have lost the best officer and friend in my Bn. You will probably get letters from other officers who know him. He was a most popular, reliable, hard working and as brave as they make them. "Had he lived I have no doubt he would have got the decoration only yesterday I recommended him for, however he has gone with a better one and left a fine example of bravery behind him. "On behalf of his brother officers and his Coy I offer our very deepest sympathy with you and yours. "Yours very sincerely "S. Kerans "PS I only heard of his death today at a hospital well behind the lines where he was hit.” He was 24 and very popular in Malvern and was for sometime a prominent member of West Malvern football club and also a member of the Cowleigh Miniature Rifle Club, where he held the Rifle Shooting Shield for twelve months. A memorial service was held for him at Holy Trinity on Friday the 20th April 1917 at 3 p.m. The boys and staff of North Malvern School were in attendance. After this service, Revd H Maynard Smith Vicar of North Malvern wrote: “He was thorough in all he undertook. He could manage little boys in a school and proved himself a commander of men. I hope for many a long year the boys of North Malvern will cherish his memory and be inspired by his splendid example. We who knew him personally mourn a friend.”

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