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We use our Facebook page to bring you all sorts of news about family history research.  So that non-Facebook users can also benefit from this useful news feed we are pulling it through onto the website. You can click on an article and read it in full without being signed up to Facebook.

Malvern Family History Society shared WLHF - Worcestershire Local History Forum's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Historic Gloucester: Revolution & Innovation Gloucester History Festival 2016 was a huge success, the next festival will be 2-17 September 2017 and the theme for this year is ‘Revolution & Innovation’. Make a note in your diary to keep these dates free and see gloucesterhistoryfestival.co.uk/ for more details

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Malvern Family History Society shared Archaeology Magazine's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Gaps in the incisors of a number of individuals excavated in Durham, England, caused by smoking clay pipes, helped identify them as 17th-century Scottish captives. archaeology.org/issues/255-1705/features/5465-scotland-dunbar-battle (Courtesy Durham University, North News and Pictures)

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Malvern Family History Society shared Brian Iles's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Here's one for Paul.

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

Many thanks to Bill Burton for communicating it to me.

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Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

25/5/1917 2/8th Worcestershire Regiment follow in 4th Worcestershire's footsteps; the story of a Malvern schoolmaster A century ago today as the men of the 4th Worcestershire Regiment (29th Division) finally moved back after being heavily engaged at the Battle of Arras, the 61st Division moved up the line, and the 2/7th and 2/8th Worcestershire came into the Arras battle-area. In the middle of May, the South Midland Territorials had been relieved by French troops in the line before St Quentin, and had been drawn back into reserve near Amiens. After a few days in that area the Division moved north. Both Worcestershire battalions marched on may 21st to Beauval and thence on May 23rd to Sus-St-Leger. Next day the two Battalions moved forward by ‘bus to billets in Arras. The stay of the 61st Division in the Arras area was, however, of but short duration. The main strength of the British Army was being shifted further north, and on June 6th it became known that the 61st Division would be transferred to Flanders. One man of the 4th Worcestershire Regiment was Malvernite, Samuel Bannister. He had Territorial connections having enlisted with his brother into the Worcestershire Yeomanry and serving in Gallipoli and Egypt before being commissioned into the Worcestershire Regiment. He was posted to the 4th Battalion, then part of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and was one of the last men to leave the Gallipoli Peninsula when Anglo-French Forces withdrew in early 1916. Samuel Bannister the second son of Samuel and Margaret Bannister of Victoria House, Cowleigh Road was born on August 19th 1892. He was educated at North Malvern Boys School, and won a scholarship to Worcester Royal Grammar School where he studied from 1905 to 1911. Not tired of education, Samuel Bannister followed his brother Joseph and sister Alice into teaching . It was later written that as a schoolboy Captain Bannister showed himself “the soul of honour and chivalry, and won not only popularity for his fine record as a student and sportsman but sincere respect from masters and boys alike for the steady loyalty with which he upheld the highest ideals and the honour of the [North Malvern] School, where his memory will ever be cherished with loving pride.” Sam Bannister was a very keen sportsman, playing both cricket and football, holding a silver cup for heavy-weight boxing and being also an accomplished rifleman. Samuel and Joseph were given leave to join the Worcestershire Yeomanry on the 2nd September 1914 and five days later left the boys at North Malvern to join the first line unit at Newbury in Nottinghamshire. In April 1915 the Yeomanry were sent to Egypt. Samuel stayed on (possibly with the regimental transport) while his brother proceeded with the rest of the unit to land at Suvla Bay on the Gallipoli Peninsula on August 8th. On the 21st August the yeoman mounted an attack on Scimitar Hill and Joseph was slightly wounded. In the meantime, Samuel had moved to Cairo and trained for a commission. He became an officer in October 1915 and was posted as a replacement to the 4th Worcestershire Regiment, which had suffered such high casualties at the Dardanelles. He landed on the Peninsula shortly after and became Bombing Officer and played an important role in the skilful evacuation of Suvla and Cape Helles on the night of the 8th/9th January 1916, being one of the last four officers to leave. The 4th Worcesters went first to Egypt, but were soon in France – disembarking on the 15th March 1916. Samuel Bannister served throughout the whole of that year, taking part in the Battle of the Somme in July and through exceptionally good work, gained the “warm approval of his superior officers and the entire trust and goodwill of his men.” He was home on leave for Christmas 1916. On his return to France he took over the duties of the Battalion Transport Officer (putting his considerable knowledge of horsemanship into good use no doubt). Not long before the opening of the Battle of Arras in April 1917, Sam Bannister was promoted to Acting Captain and given command of ‘Y’ Company. On the 12th April 1917 Bannister’s Company took over a support trench (which had been recently captured by the 12th Division) near the village of Monchy-le-Preux from the Middlesex Regiment. The 29th Division, to which Bannister’s Battalion belonged, was to carry on the attack on the 13th, but these plans were postponed. On the 14th two battalions of the Brigade attacked, but were met by a powerful counter action, and the Worcesters, who were holding the line, had to repel the advancing Germans. A soldier of ‘Y’ Company testified that Captain Bannister was “one to whom fear was unknown, and he infused his own daring spirit into his Company, which lost in him one of its best and most valued officers.” He was hit by a shell splinter which blew his left arm completely off, and he also received a terrible wound to the knee. However in spite of these injuries he refused to be carried away until a fellow officer, who he deemed to be in an even worse condition, had been evacuated. The stretcher-bearers returned to find Captain Bannister walking slowly to the first aid post. He was taken to hospital, and despite the best efforts of the medical staff, died the following day. On hearing of his death, the officer commanding the 4th Worcesters wrote to Captain Bannister’s father: “As Officer Comdg 4th Worc Regt I write to convey our sympathy with you at the great loss which has come to you in the death of your son. He had his left arm blown off on the morning of the 14th and at the same time another Officer was hit, he absolutely refused to be taken away till the other officer was cleared and expressed a wish to remain with his Coy. His courage and bravery was a fine example to those around him and when he was taken away the whole of his Coy cheered him as he left. "He was a personal friend of mine and was with me since the Dardanelles days. I put him in charge of the last party to leave Helles and Suvla on both occasions knowing I could depend on him. "I promoted him a Temporary Captain only about 10 days ago and I consider I have lost the best officer and friend in my Bn. You will probably get letters from other officers who know him. He was a most popular, reliable, hard working and as brave as they make them. "Had he lived I have no doubt he would have got the decoration only yesterday I recommended him for, however he has gone with a better one and left a fine example of bravery behind him. "On behalf of his brother officers and his Coy I offer our very deepest sympathy with you and yours. "Yours very sincerely "S. Kerans "PS I only heard of his death today at a hospital well behind the lines where he was hit.” He was 24 and very popular in Malvern and was for sometime a prominent member of West Malvern football club and also a member of the Cowleigh Miniature Rifle Club, where he held the Rifle Shooting Shield for twelve months. A memorial service was held for him at Holy Trinity on Friday the 20th April 1917 at 3 p.m. The boys and staff of North Malvern School were in attendance. After this service, Revd H Maynard Smith Vicar of North Malvern wrote: “He was thorough in all he undertook. He could manage little boys in a school and proved himself a commander of men. I hope for many a long year the boys of North Malvern will cherish his memory and be inspired by his splendid example. We who knew him personally mourn a friend.”

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Malvern Family History Society shared Jimmy Cooke's post. ... See MoreSee Less

1934

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Before 'elf an' safety went mad. ... See MoreSee Less

Butcher in High Wycombe, England, c 1938

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Malvern Family History Society shared WLHF - Worcestershire Local History Forum's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Every year, the WLHF organises a Day School with the co-operation of a forum member society.The 2017 Day School is being organised in partnership with the Malvern Civic Society and its theme is: Eminent Victorians in Worcestershire The Day School takes place at: Eden Centre, Grovewood Road, off Townsend Way, Malvern, WR14 1GD On Saturday 18 November 2017 - 9.30am to 4.15pm Tickets £7.50, pre-booked lunch available £6 Visit our web site at www.wlhf.org.uk for more details and and booking form.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Explore The Past's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

We were really pleased to find out we had been nominated and short listed for Record Keeping Service of the Year. This is an annual award run by the Archives & Records Association. The winner is decided by a public vote so we would be very grateful if you could go to www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ara_awards2017 and vote for us. The voting runs until 30 April.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Explore The Past's post. ... See MoreSee Less

We've added a new image to our Touch History Table on Level 2. By kind permission of the Bodleian Library we have a copy of the Sheldon Tapestry Map of Worcestershire. Woven in the 1590s, it is based on the Christopher Saxton map surveyed and published in the 1570s. Next time you're in The Hive come and have a closer look at the map in the County Maps folder. The Sheldon Tapestry Maps, for Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire are woven in wool and silk, and are fine examples of cartography and decorative art dating from the 1590s. They were commissioned by Ralph Sheldon, a roman Catholic Royalist and an antiquary from Weston, near Long Compton, Warwickshire, to hang in his home. The family were Midlands aristocrats and Ralph was also Sheriff of Worcester in 1576. Two of the original set, Oxfordshire and Worcestershire, are owned by the Bodleian, which received them in 1809 as a gift from Richard Gough. Reproduced here by kind permission of the Bodleian.

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