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We use our Facebook page to bring you all sorts of news about family history research.  So that non-Facebook users can also benefit from this useful news feed we are pulling it through onto the website. You can click on an article and read it in full without being signed up to Facebook.

Malvern Family History Society shared Jimmy Cooke's post. ... See MoreSee Less

1934

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Before 'elf an' safety went mad. ... See MoreSee Less

Butcher in High Wycombe, England, c 1938

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Malvern Family History Society shared WLHF - Worcestershire Local History Forum's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Every year, the WLHF organises a Day School with the co-operation of a forum member society.The 2017 Day School is being organised in partnership with the Malvern Civic Society and its theme is: Eminent Victorians in Worcestershire The Day School takes place at: Eden Centre, Grovewood Road, off Townsend Way, Malvern, WR14 1GD On Saturday 18 November 2017 - 9.30am to 4.15pm Tickets £7.50, pre-booked lunch available £6 Visit our web site at www.wlhf.org.uk for more details and and booking form.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire Archive & Archaeology Service's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

We were really pleased to find out we had been nominated and short listed for Record Keeping Service of the Year. This is an annual award run by the Archives & Records Association. The winner is decided by a public vote so we would be very grateful if you could go to www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ara_awards2017 and vote for us. The voting runs until 30 April.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire Archive & Archaeology Service's post. ... See MoreSee Less

We've added a new image to our Touch History Table on Level 2. By kind permission of the Bodleian Library we have a copy of the Sheldon Tapestry Map of Worcestershire. Woven in the 1590s, it is based on the Christopher Saxton map surveyed and published in the 1570s. Next time you're in The Hive come and have a closer look at the map in the County Maps folder. The Sheldon Tapestry Maps, for Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire are woven in wool and silk, and are fine examples of cartography and decorative art dating from the 1590s. They were commissioned by Ralph Sheldon, a roman Catholic Royalist and an antiquary from Weston, near Long Compton, Warwickshire, to hang in his home. The family were Midlands aristocrats and Ralph was also Sheriff of Worcester in 1576. Two of the original set, Oxfordshire and Worcestershire, are owned by the Bodleian, which received them in 1809 as a gift from Richard Gough. Reproduced here by kind permission of the Bodleian.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire Archive & Archaeology Service's post. ... See MoreSee Less

We currently have a display of the Worcester Revealed supplements which were published in Berrow's Worcester Journal last year. We contributed a number of stories about Worcester's past to the supplement, including Dig Lich St, Commission of Array, Gunpowder Plot, painter Joseph Blackburn and our Mayflower connection. Large copies of the pages were produced and we have them on Level 2 of The Hive just by the Explore the Past desk. If you're in The Hive come and have a look!

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

ST'ANN'S WELL before 1900. St.Ann's Well "is situate in a ravine or gorge formed by the subsidence or meeting of two subordinate hills. It is the last habitation which the pilgrim passes staff in hand in his upward march to the summit, and its little group of mountain ash and maple are the last trees or shrubs he meets, or I believe the sheer mountain air will allow to grow. "The water itself, which dribbles away into a carved stone basin at the rate of about a glass a minute, through a kind of penny whistle placed in the mouth of a pleasant dolphin, is quaffed by crowds in a little house which is half a pedlar's shop and half a pump room, attached to a cottage where knives and forks are hired out to tourists, and kidneys surreptitiously grilled between meals for hungry patients under water treatment. Here, too, "A German band, supported by subscription, play every morning at eight, when invalids imbibe the pure element...." From "Three weeks in wet sheets, the diary and doings of a moist visitor to Malvern" by J Leech (1851)

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Malvern Family History Society shared Jimmy Cooke's post. ... See MoreSee Less

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

SIDNEY HOUSE 1823 to 1914 The growth of Malvern began with the building of The Foley Hotel, the Pump Room and Baths (designed by Samuel Deykes) and the Library and Assembly Rooms (designed by John Deykes) between 1815 and 1823. Mary Southall described Malvern at the time as “a charming village… a very pleasing residence, and, in the season, is generally filled with company who visit the place, either for its romantic beauties, salubrious air, or healing waters”. The increasing number of visitors to Malvern were accommodated in the elegant Regency houses along, what would have been referred to at the time as the Turnpike Road and which we now refer to as Worcester Road. They were, as Pamela Hurle says, “part of the Foley Estate… and let to comfortable middle-class men of some substance. Their views over the Severn Plain gave them particular appeal as boarding houses”. She also points out, when referring specifically to Sidney House which was completed in 1823, that “the clean lines… are in contrast to the Malvern stone houses built in the later in the 19th century”. Sidney House is a Grade 2 Listed Building described as: “Early C19. Two storeys in stucco with slate roof and wide eaves. Three windows, hung sashes with glazing bars, the centre window in shallow round-headed recess, the outer in cambered-headed recesses, plain band at floor level. Central round-headed doorway with reeded architrave surround, round-arched fanlight, later glazed door. Flat-topped wood portico with moulded cornice on 2 columns, half-columns to wall.” In 1851 John Key, previously of Clifton-upon-Teme, was living at “Sidney Cottage”, with his niece, Mary Ann Fleming. His wife, Ann, had died the previous year. He was described in the Census as a ‘proprietor of houses’ and was obviously a figure of some importance in the town as he was an Overseer of the Abbey Church. Although John Lees (a forty year old ‘landed proprietor’ born in Oldham, Lancashire) and his wife and daughter were living at ‘Sidney House’ at this time, John Key was most likely the owner. John Key married his second wife, Mary (nee Brook) of Kinver, Staffordshire at the Abbey Church on August 26th 1857. Their marriage only lasted four years as John died in 1861 leaving his wife as the ‘lodging house keeper’ at Sidney House for the next twenty years, until her death on 10th May 1881 aged seventy six. Her brother, Thomas Hooper Brook, who was a retired draper, lived with her in the later years. When he died in 1884 he was described as ‘formerly of Sidney House, Great Malvern’. After her death, her furniture was auctioned on the 25th April 1882 by Mr Bentley of Malvern. It was not, however, until 27th October 1886 that the “very excellent, valuable, and commodious residence ‘SIDNEY HOUSE’, with which is combined a comfortable Cottage, together with Stable, Coach-house, Pleasure Ground, Garden and Orchard” was sold at an auction at the Belle Vue Hotel. The advertisement for the sale states that Mrs Burlingham was in residence “at an annual rent of £120”. She obviously stayed on after the sale, as a report in the ‘Worcester Chronicle’ of 24th December 1887 entitled “Peculiar Charge of Housebreaking at Malvern” mentions her. In 1891 Eliza Bird is “lodging house keeper”, supported by her husband, George (described in an advertisement some years earlier when he was living in Poolend Street, as 'plumber, glazier, painter, paper-hanger, gas fitter, &c.,') and living with their son, Albert (an upholsterer) and their teenage daughters Amy and Mary. They have six lodgers and a boarder at the time of the Census, as well as two servants. George died in 1892. A report in the ‘Worcestershire Chronicle' of 8th June 1895 mentions that Malvern Urban District Council approved the “rearrangement of drainage at Sidney House”. Six years later the house was occupied by a medical practitioner from Birmingham named Edmund Antrobus and his sister, Evelyn. He was the son of a master jeweller named Phillip and his wife Lucy. He also appears to have lived in a house further down the road, called ‘The Chase’, for a short time before he died prematurely at the age of forty-five, in 1907. The circumstances could lead one to believe that he had moved to Malvern because of ill-health. By 1911 Caroline Henderson, a widow, had moved from 3 The Promenade where she was a lodging house keeper, to “Sidney House” where she was described as running a boarding house. Bennet’s Business Directory (1914) does not list the house as apartments or as a boarding house. For Alexandra Victoria Thornton Hopwood.

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Malvern Family History Society shared Lives of the First World War's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

On this day in 1916 Alexander Gibson Forsyth of the 4th Australian Light Horse died of pneumonia at Delhi Military Hospital in Tidworth. Alexander was born in Mansfield Victoria, Australia to Alexander and Mary Forsyth. His grandfather was Dr James Robert McTurk, who was a surgeon in the Crimean War. He had enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force in Melbourne. We will remember him. ow.ly/HvXU30aecaF Image IWM HU 122267 Portrait from the Bond of Sacrifice collection

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Malvern Family History Society shared Family Tree Magazine's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Let us know what you REALLY think and you could win a day at the Society of Genealogists in London! familytr.ee/ftreader17 #familyhistory #genealogy

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Malvern Family History Society shared Heather Talbot's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Sorry. Put this on wrong page. Board in the Cemetery Chapel Malvern Wells. Believed to come from a Boy's school. Not from St Peter's Malvern Wells, which board is where?

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Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire Archive & Archaeology Service's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

There are still a few places left on our popular House History workshop tomorrow when we'll be looking at how you can research the history of your house (or other building). It runs from 10am-1pm and cost £15. To book your place please go to e-services.worcestershire.gov.uk/LibraryEvents/EventDetails.aspx?id=306

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