Facebook

We use our Facebook page to bring you all sorts of news about family history research.  So that non-Facebook users can also benefit from this useful news feed we are pulling it through onto the website. You can click on an article and read it in full without being signed up to Facebook.

Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

16/9/1917 Memorial Service held for Malvern Boy Scout turned soldier A century ago today, church parades were held for both the 1/8th and 2/8th Worcesters. During the 2/8th's parade, it was announced that 241086 Pte Charles Griffiths had been awarded Military Medal. At home, at All Saints Church, the Wyche, Malvern an evening memorial service was held for one of the sons of the parish - Albert Somers Bray. The eldest son of Mr and Mrs A Bray of Willow Cottage, Lower Wyche, 241421 Cpl Bray had been killed in action on 27th August 1917 during the 2/8th Worcesters' failed attack on Aisne Farm. He was 19 years of age. The close relationships created in the formation of Territorial units were demonstrated by a heartfelt letter written to the family by Lieutenant & Adjutant John Graham, who before the war had also been Albert's scoutmaster. “I have the saddest news to tell you, and yet one of the glorious pages in the history of men. At last our turn came to ‘go over the top’ and do our bit, and, alas! poor Bertie was killed – shot through the head, whilst in the forefront of his platoon. "His Company were in the leading line, and every man was full of hope at the chance of doing his share. As the Divisional Commander sad, ‘The troops went over like a man.’ but the conditions were against us. The ground was like a bog, owing to a pouring wet night before. The shell holes were full of water… I shall never forget it, and the great bravery of all our men. Bertie was the pick of his Company, and a great lad – always cheery and bright, always a smile on his face, and every to be relied on to do his job. "His Company Commander thought a lot of him, although he was so very young. You know what I think of him, and I can’t put it into words, as my eyes become dim; but whether we live or died, anyone who has fought and died out here will surely rest in peace for the rest of time, and what better death could one have than knowing one has died to save others? "My sympathy with you all is more than I can put into words, and I feel that I, perhaps more than anyone else, must bear it with you, as it is one of the hardest things for me to bear, when I hear that one of my Boy Scouts has made the supreme sacrifice. If it is any consolation, you may know he died instantaneously, and could have suffered no pain. I can’t write more now, as I am myself played out, but I will write and tell you more about him one day. In the meantime, accept my true sympathy and a share in your irreparable loss.” Albert had at one time he was employed at the Council Officers, Malvern, and afterwards secured an appointment in the Bursar’s Office at Malvern College. As soon as he was old enough, he joined the Worcestershire Regiment in October 1915. And so, on Sunday evening the Revd A Linzee Giles (Vicar of Malvern) conducted the memorial service at All Saints’ Church, the Wyche. Boy Scouts attended the service, and there was a crowded congregation. The hymns were “Fight the good fight” and “For all the saints.” Mr J B Burston, the organist, played “O rest in the Lord” the congregation standing, and the National anthem. An appropriate sermon was preached by the Vicar of Malvern.

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

31/8/1917 "His exceptional courage and coolness enabled him to perform his technical work with skill and untiring devotion to duty..." The story of a Malvern stretcher bearer Archibald Corbett was born at Fernhill Heath in 1894, the son of Thomas and Ada Corbett. Thomas delivered bread for a baker. By 1901 the family had moved to 5 Redland Terrace, Malvern Link. Sadly Thomas died in 1905, and his mother, unable to support he two sons and a daughter found a place for Archibald in the Royal Albert Orphanage, Henwick. Candidates for admission were required to be orphan children “who have lost one or both parents, and whose parents have resided in Worcestershire for 3 years immediately preceding nomination.” In 1913 Archibald joined the Territorials – the 8th Worcestershire Regiment. He was mobilised at the beginning of the First World War and trained with them in Essex. He served overseas with them from 1st April 1915. He was gassed on the Somme on 20th July 1916, along with nearly all the rest of the battalion and rejoined the unit in December 1916. He served as a Company stretcher bearer and was awarded the Military Medal for his bravery during the battalion's attack on Springfield Farm on 27th August 1917. The citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on the LANGEMARK LINE, N.E. of ST. JULIEN 27.8.17. "This stretcher bearer continually exposed himself to imminent risk of his life from a heavy enemy barrage fire to tend the wounded of his and other Companies. His exceptional courage and coolness enabled him to perform his technical work with skill and untiring devotion to duty – tending a number of cases under heavy machine gun and rifle fire, with no cover, showing a complete disregard of personal danger, as personally witnessed by the Company Commanders, and as to results by the Medical Officer.” Edward Corbett, who served with the battalion during the first world wrote of stretcher bearers at this time: “…stretcher-bearing is an arduous and costly duty. It is supposed that this is done by the men of the R.A.M.C., which is by no means the case. Ordinarily the Regimental stretcher-bearers do it all, with assistance (if needed) from their comrades. In big actions, the Medical Corps provide parties, and when the casualties are very numerous the Reserves help. In our Regimental stretcher-bearers we were very fortunate. They were experts in first aid and bone-setting, kind and assiduous in their duties; and no praise can be too high for these gallant and industrious men."” Archibald Corbett survived the war and afterwards became a gentlemen’s valet. He emigrated to Australia in 1922.

View on Facebook

Francis Brett Young's Worcestershire.
A portrait of Worcestershire through the words of local novelist and poet Francis Brett Young (1884-1954)who regarded the county of his birth as the most beautiful place on earth. An illustrated talk by Dr Michael Hall, who has extensively researched the author's life and works and is Chairman of the Francis Brett Young Society.
mfhs.org.uk/meetings/
... See MoreSee Less

September meeting

September 6, 2017, 7:00pm - September 6, 2017, 9:00pm

Francis Brett Young's Worcestershire. A portrait of Worcestershire through the words of local novelist and poet Francis Brett Young (1884-1954)who regarded the county of his birth as the most beautiful place on earth. An illustrated talk by Dr Michael Hall, who has extensively researched the author's life and works and is Chairman of the Francis Brett Young Society. mfhs.org.uk/meetings/

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared Worcestershire rememberthefallen.co.uk's event. ... See MoreSee Less

Passchendaele Remembered

November 4, 2017, 10:00am - November 4, 2017, 3:30pm

Details of our event on 4th November 2017 - Passchendaele Remembered

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared Explore The Past's post. ... See MoreSee Less

Are you off to Worcester Beer Festival this weekend? Did you know Worcester used to have an official ale taster? They would need to check on the quality of the beer, which was usually brewed on site, and if anyone was found selling bad ale they would be reported to the courts. So the job may not have been as popular as it might seem! The Ale Taster had to swear an oath, like many other office holder, and this is contained in an oath book in the Worcester City Archives. Read more about it on our blog www.explorethepast.co.uk/2013/12/treasures-from-worcestershires-past-2-the-ale-tasters-oath/

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared Jimmy Cooke's post. ... See MoreSee Less

1960 must have been a wonderful place to live

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared Worcester's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Date for your diaries! Come along and see many more of the fascinating historic photos we've been posting on this page, share your memories and hear more about a project to make the collection available online.

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

GEORGE DANDY was a coal merchant at “ASTWOOD”, Barnards Green from about 1910 until his death in 1941. His wife Ada Mary (nee Blencowe) continued the business for a short period after this date. The house was so-named because George was born at Astwood Bank, Alcester to John (a farm labourer) and Emma Jane (charwoman). In fact, as they lived next door to “Astwood Court”, it seems probable that he worked at “Astwood Court Farm”. George had two sisters (Emma Elizabeth & Ellen Sophia) and four brothers (William, Albert, Ernest & Frederick). Whereas his sisters seem to have stayed close to the family home, all of the brothers moved to Malvern to be employed in jobs linked to coal and the railway. In 1901 William (b 1865) was a ‘porter on railway’ living at Green Hill Cottage, Malvern Common: George (b 4th May 1872) also lived at Green Hill Cottage but working as a ‘coal yardsman’: Albert (b 1869), Ernest (b 1877) and Frederick (b 1882) were ‘coal carters’; living in cottages in Poolbrook. Fred later moved to Shardlow, Derbyshire where by 1939 he had become an “engine driver at the iron works”. Littlebury’s Directory for 1908 lists George Dandy as a “salesman” working for J & N Nadin & Co. and Edward Dandy (could this actually be Ernest?) as salesman for South Wales & Cannock Chase Coal Co at Midland siding, ST.Andrew's Road. By 1911 George and Ada - with five year old William George, ten year old Dorris May and four year old Gladys May Naylor who was adopted - had moved in to “ASTWOOD” with the back yard (pictured) opening onto Upper Chase Road (Number 17 shown) being used for the coal business. George’s mother died in Malvern in 1916 as did his father in 1927. He continued working until his death in 1941, the same year that his son William John, who was in the Royal Army Medical Corps, died. Ada appears to have moved out of “Astwood” soon after and died in Evesham in 1955. Further points: Has anyone evidence that George and Ada had links with the Salvation Army (two salvationists stayed with them as visitors in 1911)? Did the yard on to Upper Chase Road continue to be used as a coal merchants after WW2? I have more information about Albert, Ernest & Frederick. Also, I have some deductions about Gladys May Naylor if anyone has a specific interest. PHOTO IS COPYRIGHT AS I PAID A LOT OF MONEY FOR IT LAST WEEK! May be of interest Geoff Lewis .

View on Facebook

The Society's July meeting.

5th July 2017 at 7pm
At Dyson Perrins Academy, Yates Hay Road, Malvern. WR14 1WD

Our Annual General Meeting takes place this month and we try to follow this with a topical subject of interest to our members. We are pleased to announce that we will have a short talk from Frank Townsend on the General Registry Office and the changes that have taken place in recent months along with the plans that are being proposed for the future. These have a significant effect and hoped for benefits for us family historians.
Please join us for our annual review and to hear this latest news on the GRO before our summer break in August.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Malvern Family History Society shared WLHF - Worcestershire Local History Forum's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Historic Gloucester: Revolution & Innovation Gloucester History Festival 2016 was a huge success, the next festival will be 2-17 September 2017 and the theme for this year is ‘Revolution & Innovation’. Make a note in your diary to keep these dates free and see gloucesterhistoryfestival.co.uk/ for more details

View on Facebook
Share