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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

I'm not sure it this is of interest to anyone but in the Bodleian Library there is a wall hanging - imagine my surprise when I found it was Worcestershire.

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

Not Malvern but I thought his photograph from the Berrow’s Worcester Journal of November 26th 1910 which shows an amazing fig tree and four elderly (and equally amazing) ladies might be of interest. From left to right - MRS HANNAH HARDMAN (seamstress born in 1829 at Bishops Frome), Mrs MARY ANN BAYLISS (charwoman born in 1841 at Overbury), Mrs ELIZA ABIGAIL LAMPITT (charwoman, formerly a shirt maker born in 1825 at Suckley) & Mrs ELIZABETH LUDLOW (gloveress & finisher born in 1840 at Wichenford). They lived at Numbers 1 to 4 St.Clements Square, School Walk, Worcester.

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

Hello everyone - I wonder if anyone can help? I'm trying to trace Madeleine Smith (nee Hughes) who married Anthony Jones in Malvern in 1964. Her father, grandfather and great-grandfather served in the Malvern Territorials (Royal Artillery) and I'm putting together an article about them. Her father, Dennis Reno Hughes lived in Borrowdale Road until his death in 2007. Dennis was the son of Henry Hughes and his Italian wife Antonietta who he had met while serving with the territorial gunners in Italy in 1918 (pictured). In turn Henry's father had volunteered to serve in the Boer War. Henry Hughes was a Malvern town fireman in the 1920s and 1930s and lived for sometime in the old lodge (pictured) to the Council House on the corner of Church Street and Avenue Road. Quite a story of service to the country and the community. I'd love to find out more and perhaps find some photos of them, I've also posted in the Malvern Memories Page.

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Malvern Family History Society has been given these photographs taken in either Worcester or Malvern by Bennett's photographers and we wonder if anyone recognizes the people as being from their family. On the back of the lady it has the name Gertrude Mabel Hunt date Aug 1874 and on the back of the girl Evelyn Millichamp, no date. Both surnames are local to the area. ... See MoreSee Less

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Malvern Family History Society shared a post. ... See MoreSee Less

Malvern Wells - The Main Road ...No Date

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Malvern Family History Society shared Martin Theaker's post. ... See MoreSee Less

I've been contacted this week by another historian who has sent me a few more pictures of the Dutch troops in Malvern (Wood Farm Camp) during WW2. There's also a further set of pictures taken from the same period on this site: www.indiegangers.nl/index.php/nederlands-indie-foto-galerij/gk/do#!2___WoodfarmCamp_MalvernWells

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Malvern Family History Society shared The Hive's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

The Hive Christmas Closure times are up on our website. Please spread the news and share with your Hive fan friends that we will be closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. ow.ly/RIaS30gKKmf

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Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

16/9/1917 Memorial Service held for Malvern Boy Scout turned soldier A century ago today, church parades were held for both the 1/8th and 2/8th Worcesters. During the 2/8th's parade, it was announced that 241086 Pte Charles Griffiths had been awarded Military Medal. At home, at All Saints Church, the Wyche, Malvern an evening memorial service was held for one of the sons of the parish - Albert Somers Bray. The eldest son of Mr and Mrs A Bray of Willow Cottage, Lower Wyche, 241421 Cpl Bray had been killed in action on 27th August 1917 during the 2/8th Worcesters' failed attack on Aisne Farm. He was 19 years of age. The close relationships created in the formation of Territorial units were demonstrated by a heartfelt letter written to the family by Lieutenant & Adjutant John Graham, who before the war had also been Albert's scoutmaster. “I have the saddest news to tell you, and yet one of the glorious pages in the history of men. At last our turn came to ‘go over the top’ and do our bit, and, alas! poor Bertie was killed – shot through the head, whilst in the forefront of his platoon. "His Company were in the leading line, and every man was full of hope at the chance of doing his share. As the Divisional Commander sad, ‘The troops went over like a man.’ but the conditions were against us. The ground was like a bog, owing to a pouring wet night before. The shell holes were full of water… I shall never forget it, and the great bravery of all our men. Bertie was the pick of his Company, and a great lad – always cheery and bright, always a smile on his face, and every to be relied on to do his job. "His Company Commander thought a lot of him, although he was so very young. You know what I think of him, and I can’t put it into words, as my eyes become dim; but whether we live or died, anyone who has fought and died out here will surely rest in peace for the rest of time, and what better death could one have than knowing one has died to save others? "My sympathy with you all is more than I can put into words, and I feel that I, perhaps more than anyone else, must bear it with you, as it is one of the hardest things for me to bear, when I hear that one of my Boy Scouts has made the supreme sacrifice. If it is any consolation, you may know he died instantaneously, and could have suffered no pain. I can’t write more now, as I am myself played out, but I will write and tell you more about him one day. In the meantime, accept my true sympathy and a share in your irreparable loss.” Albert had at one time he was employed at the Council Officers, Malvern, and afterwards secured an appointment in the Bursar’s Office at Malvern College. As soon as he was old enough, he joined the Worcestershire Regiment in October 1915. And so, on Sunday evening the Revd A Linzee Giles (Vicar of Malvern) conducted the memorial service at All Saints’ Church, the Wyche. Boy Scouts attended the service, and there was a crowded congregation. The hymns were “Fight the good fight” and “For all the saints.” Mr J B Burston, the organist, played “O rest in the Lord” the congregation standing, and the National anthem. An appropriate sermon was preached by the Vicar of Malvern.

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Malvern Family History Society shared 8th Worcesters 100's post. ... See MoreSee Less

31/8/1917 "His exceptional courage and coolness enabled him to perform his technical work with skill and untiring devotion to duty..." The story of a Malvern stretcher bearer Archibald Corbett was born at Fernhill Heath in 1894, the son of Thomas and Ada Corbett. Thomas delivered bread for a baker. By 1901 the family had moved to 5 Redland Terrace, Malvern Link. Sadly Thomas died in 1905, and his mother, unable to support he two sons and a daughter found a place for Archibald in the Royal Albert Orphanage, Henwick. Candidates for admission were required to be orphan children “who have lost one or both parents, and whose parents have resided in Worcestershire for 3 years immediately preceding nomination.” In 1913 Archibald joined the Territorials – the 8th Worcestershire Regiment. He was mobilised at the beginning of the First World War and trained with them in Essex. He served overseas with them from 1st April 1915. He was gassed on the Somme on 20th July 1916, along with nearly all the rest of the battalion and rejoined the unit in December 1916. He served as a Company stretcher bearer and was awarded the Military Medal for his bravery during the battalion's attack on Springfield Farm on 27th August 1917. The citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on the LANGEMARK LINE, N.E. of ST. JULIEN 27.8.17. "This stretcher bearer continually exposed himself to imminent risk of his life from a heavy enemy barrage fire to tend the wounded of his and other Companies. His exceptional courage and coolness enabled him to perform his technical work with skill and untiring devotion to duty – tending a number of cases under heavy machine gun and rifle fire, with no cover, showing a complete disregard of personal danger, as personally witnessed by the Company Commanders, and as to results by the Medical Officer.” Edward Corbett, who served with the battalion during the first world wrote of stretcher bearers at this time: “…stretcher-bearing is an arduous and costly duty. It is supposed that this is done by the men of the R.A.M.C., which is by no means the case. Ordinarily the Regimental stretcher-bearers do it all, with assistance (if needed) from their comrades. In big actions, the Medical Corps provide parties, and when the casualties are very numerous the Reserves help. In our Regimental stretcher-bearers we were very fortunate. They were experts in first aid and bone-setting, kind and assiduous in their duties; and no praise can be too high for these gallant and industrious men."” Archibald Corbett survived the war and afterwards became a gentlemen’s valet. He emigrated to Australia in 1922.

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Francis Brett Young's Worcestershire.
A portrait of Worcestershire through the words of local novelist and poet Francis Brett Young (1884-1954)who regarded the county of his birth as the most beautiful place on earth. An illustrated talk by Dr Michael Hall, who has extensively researched the author's life and works and is Chairman of the Francis Brett Young Society.
mfhs.org.uk/meetings/
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September meeting

September 6, 2017, 7:00pm - September 6, 2017, 9:00pm

Francis Brett Young's Worcestershire. A portrait of Worcestershire through the words of local novelist and poet Francis Brett Young (1884-1954)who regarded the county of his birth as the most beautiful place on earth. An illustrated talk by Dr Michael Hall, who has extensively researched the author's life and works and is Chairman of the Francis Brett Young Society. mfhs.org.uk/meetings/

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